No Is A Four Letter Word by Chris Jericho
Review / August 20, 2019

One of the big perils of successful career autobiographies — as seen with Mick Foley — is that subsequent volumes cover a shorter and shorter period and require more padding out of concentration on trivial detail. Chris Jericho has presumably tried to avoid this with his fourth book, which is presented not as a chronological sequel but rather a self-help motivational title. Such an approach can work, as shown in Bobby Heenan’s follow-up to his original career autobiography. Here, though, it falls flat. The book follows a consistent pattern in each of its 20 chapters: Jericho introduces a generic platitude (most of which come down to “work hard and believe in yourself), then recounts some incidents from his life that relate to it with varying degrees of relevance. This usually fails in two separate ways. One is that the connections are usually strained at best. For example, “don’t take no for an answer” is illustrated by an incident when he was late for an airport check-in, resigned himself to waiting for the next flight, then was recognised as a TV star by a staff member who spontaneously offered to bend the rules. The incident neither proves the point, nor has much use…

Life Is Short And So Am I by Dylan “Hornswoggle” Postl with Ross Owen Williams
Review / August 20, 2019

A Hornwsoggle autobiography might not seem the most obviously engaging title, but it could be the sleeper surprise of 2019. While the book does address Postl’s height and medical condition, it’s very much not a cliched story of “triumph over tragedy”. Instead most of the detail on the subject is about the practicalities of his lack of height such as the fact he can drive a car without any problems but would likely be endangered rather than helped were his airbag to deploy. Wrestling makes up the bulk of the book and in turn his WWE stint makes up the bulk of his career. It’s a great insight into the pros and cons of a WWE run, with a few added twists such as spending many hours under the ring during live events and TV shows. The book is ghostwritten by Ross Williams and as with his previous collaborations with Bob Holly and Al Snow, it feels honestly told rather than a deliberate attempt to either maintain good relations or settle old scores. There’s plenty of acknowledgement of the opportunities and fortune of travelling the country and being a TV star, but also the frustration at an impenetrable creative process…