Smarten Up! Say It Right by Brian Blair
Review / July 31, 2019

Unfortunately this is a book with redundant content in a redundant format. Published in 2001, this is at heart a listing of around 150 insider wrestling terms with definitions and examples of usage. While that may have been of interest to some readers back when online wrestling content was more limited, it’s a topic covered by countless readily-available webpages today. In theory the book has some value in that Blair is a wrestler giving trustworthy information about how terms really were used by those in the business rather than smarks. The problem is that many of the terms have become so widely known in their correct form that they’ve even become part of the on-screen product, a topic that’s been discussed in linguistic journals. Others are hardly exclusive to wrestling: terms such as burning a bridge, breaking in or old-timers are easy to understand without any specialist knowledge. There are a few genuinely lesser-known phrases in here such as a cement mixer (a stiff, unflexible wrestler), a fence builder (a wrestler who refuses to share groupies or ring rats) and to heel a room (have more people sleep in the room than the permitted occupancy to save cash) but they aren’t enough to…

Spandex Ballet by Lee Kyle
Review / July 30, 2019

Buy on Amazon Some wrestling autobiographies amaze with their tales of reaching the heights of fame and success with international promotions. This is not one of those autobiographies, but it’s all the better for it. Kyle — now a stand-up comedian — was what can generously be called a low-level indy wrestler in the Northeast of England in the early and mid 2000s. The book tells the story of his early years as a fan and then his time in the ring during periods of both unemployment and menial jobs. The book is genuinely laugh-out-loud funny throughout thanks to Kyle’s dry humour and unconventionally conversational writing style, though more of the laughs come in the fan section, with lines such as: …it was CLEARLY real, I mean, sure, sometimes I was confused by things, like occasionally you’d see people talking to each other in the ring but I just assumed they were saying stuff like “I’m going to bloody deck you in a minute” or “I’m class at wrestling compared to you.” There’s also the incredible tale of the the top 40 wall, something I will leave as a a treat for those who buythe book. While the wrestling section…

Recent Release Roundup
News / July 29, 2019

The following recent releases did not get advance listings and thus weren’t in our weekly release schedule. Thanks to Alex Sarti for spotting a couple of these titles. Strong Style by Scott Norton & Adam Randis Strong Style is the autobiography of Scott “Flash” Norton, world arm-wrestling champion and professional wrestler whose career spanned the AWA, WCW, and New Japan Pro Wrestling. His career took him to ice roads in northern Canada, Pay Per View, small rural towns in Japan, the Tokyo Dome, and North Korea. This autobiography provides an honest look back at the many successes in Norton’s career as well as the hardships and personal growth he experienced. Readers will spend a significant period of time with Norton during his career as one of the few Western wrestlers to become the heavyweight champion of a major Japanese promotion and his relationships with the wrestlers and fans on both sides of the Pacific. This book is filled with personal stories, anecdotes, and wrestling “ribs” that will amuse and enlighten wrestling and non-wrestling fans alike. Unladylike: A Grrrl’s Guide to Wrestling by Heather Von Bandenburg Forget what you think you know about wrestling. In the world of Heather Honeybadger, aka Rana Venenosa,…

Release Schedule (24 July)
Release Schedule / July 24, 2019

One new entry this week,Wrestling Action Figures of the Early 1990s by Kevin Williams: Step back into the ring and recapture the golden days of wrestling as we look back on the legendary action figures from the early 1990s. Check out the toy line that rocked the world featuring wrestling legends such as Hulk Hogan, Rowdy Roddy Piper and Ric Flair.As well as lavish illustrations of the heroes and villains themselves, Kevin Williams follows the story of how these action figures developed a large number of dedicated and fanatic followers who have turned these toys into highly collectible items. A nostalgic journey back to the heyday of professional wrestling and a golden era of action figures, this book is sure to delight fans and collectors both young and old. 6 August: The Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame: The Storytellers (From the Terrible Turk to Twitter) by Greg Oliver & Steven Johnson 6 August:  There’s No Such Thing As a Bad Kid: How I Went from Stereotype to Prototype by Thaddeus Bullard (Titus O’Neill) & Paul Guzzo (Check out my review) 20 August: Jim Cornette Presents: Behind the Curtain – Real Pro Wrestling Stories by Jim Cornette & Brandon Easton 1…

Steel Chair To The Head edited by Nicholas Sammond
Review / July 12, 2019

There’s a lot of talk about the wrestling bubble and it’s always interesting to get the perspectives of people who don’t follow professional wrestling as a fan, but this collection of academic essays is often a case of missing the point. As you’d expect if you’ve ever seen the references section of a college paper on wrestling, this starts with philosopher Roland Barthes’s 1957 essay “The World of Wrestling.” Respected as Barthes may be in his field, this doesn’t offer much depth or insight: even in the 1950s, it shouldn’t have come across as a stroke of genius to note that wrestling is a performance of good and evil and a morality tale rather than a pure sport. The problem is that there’s little if any acknowledgement that pro bouts are put on primarily to draw ticket-paying customers rather than as a moral and artistic cause in their own right. Many of the essays are along similar lines, focusing on wrestling being a masculine melodrama, political allegory or even a sado-masochistic narrative, with many of the points somewhat undermined by reading levels of symbolism that were surely not intended by the performers involved. Some parts are more intriguing though, including…

Steve Rickard’s Life On The Mat by John Mancer
Review / July 11, 2019

This biography of the New Zealand promoter and wrestler, who died on 5 April 2015, is an entertaining enough read but not worth going out of your way to track down. Rickard wrestled briefly in North America but mainly divided his time between his native land and travelling the Pacific region. He was a regular NWA member and even spent a brief period as president in the 1990s, long after its heyday. He was best known for producing the show On The Mat which aired in New Zealand as well as being syndicated. Author Mancer was a sportswriter, but was a friend and colleague of Rickard, so this is hardly an objective or critical book. It’s also not a strict chronological life story, but rather darts about from subject to subject, including a particularly entertaining chapter on New Zealand wrestler Lofty Bloomfield and his supposedly inescapable finishing hold. The book doesn’t break kayfabe, but does frequently note that opponents are able to peacefully coexist out of the ring, so never comes across as insulting in a modern context. There’s not a great deal for the historians as there’s little detail on matches and limited insight into Rickard’s tactics and philosophy…

There’s No Such Thing As a Bad Kid: How I Went from Stereotype to Prototype by Titus O’Neil
Review / July 10, 2019

In no way a pro wrestling book, this might appeal to dedicated O’Neil fans. It’s half-autobiography, half-social science manual, but only deals with O’Neil’s childhood and university days. The wrestling references limited to a couple of paragraphs on his spectacular Saudi Arabia ring entrance and winning the tag titles, plus a page or two describing his entry into the developmental system. Instead the book is a well-written argument about the need to give children positive reinforcement rather than dismiss them as inherently misbehaved. Much of it is based around his own experience in a single parent family from a disadvantaged background and his time in a retreat camp for troubled teens. Considering most of the examples and arguments are simply elaborations on the theme of the title, it doesn’t become repetitive and certainly might interest those in the education and social care sector. There’s also some interesting takes on the college sports culture. However, it’s impossible to recommend this to anyone whose sole motivation in reading it is O’Neill’s wrestling status, other than his most devoted fans. Instead it’s a book that will appeal or not in its own right and those who still choose to read it with that…

Stu Hart by Marsha Erb
Review / July 10, 2019

This isn’t a book that gets a lot of talk, but it’s certainly one of the better wrestler biographies out there. Although a lawyer by trade, Erb was formerly a journalist and approached the project from that perspective rather than primarily as a wrestling fan. While there’s no shortage of wrestling material here, it’s far more of an individual life story than the territorial history of the also-excellent Pain and Passion by Heath McCoy. And what a life story that is. While most fans know the tales of Hart’s sprawling family in their Hart house and the infamous dungeon, many reading this will be shocked to learn of his impoverished childhood, at one stage living with his family in a tent during winters of -20C or below. There’s also plenty about his wrestling career before turning to promoting. Erb pulls off an impressive balancing act of including Hart’s recollections though first-hand quotes from interviewing him, but still keeping the book as an objective, independent account. It’s important to note that the book is predominately about Stu’s life and only contains brief mention of his many offspring’s time in wrestling, particularly outside of Stampede. That makes for a more focused book, but could…

Release Schedule (10 July)
Release Schedule / July 10, 2019

Two new entries this week starting with New Jack: Memoir of a Pro Wrestling Extremist by New Jack: You may have cheered for New Jack. You may have booed him out of the building. You may have even feared him at times. But until now, you’ve never really known The Most Dangerous Man in Wrestling. For the first time, the man born Jerome Young opens up about how he became one of the stars who enabled Extreme Championship Wrestling to make a permanent mark on the professional landscape. His crazed dives off balconies and scaffolds; his bloody, weapon-filled mat wars that trampled the line between reality and entertainment–this memoir reveals the perspective of the man at the center of them all and includes new disclosures about the infamous incidents with Mass Transit, Gypsy Joe, and the stabbing of a fellow wrestler in Florida. Beyond the gimmicks that united white supremacists and the NAACP against him and his fellow performers, New Jack candidly discusses the violence in his youth that nearly led him to a career in crime, his past as a bounty hunter, a near-fatal drug addiction, the last months of ECW, and his place in wrestling history. And Professional…

Superhero Ninja Wrestling Star by Lorna Schultz Nicholson
Review / July 9, 2019

There’s only a slim connection with pro wrestling, but this is a fun enough children’s book, though you might want to shop around on the price. The bulk of the story is about 11-year-old Archie who feels undersized after his friends and foes go through growth spurts. He then tries a range of tactics to both bulk up and improve his social standing, which backfire in a manner of amusing ways. The wrestling element comes in two parts. There’s a memorable scene in a family restaurant run by a former pro (with a couple of nice lines to make fans from the 80s and 90s really feel their age.) There’s also a subplot with Archie learning amateur wrestling that proves somewhat pivotal to the payoff. It feels a little churlish to criticize the pacing of a childrens’ book, but the resolution of the tension does have RKO tendencies. We never actually see how Archie’s wrestling tournament career works out as that’s not the point of the story’s conclusion, though there’s definitely room for a sequel. I’m probably not the best reviewer to judge how well-pitched the writing is for the intended audience. I found the dialogue irritating at times, but given my age, that means…