The Stone Cold Truth by Steve Austin
Review / June 11, 2019

Among the mid-level of the WWE autobiographies, this title is ghostwritten by former WWF and WCW magazine writer Dennis Brent. It’s a decent recap of Austin’s career, though a little short on detail. That’s largely because it’s written in an authentic Austin voice and is certainly a no-nonsense title. Perhaps appropriately, Austin picks his spots to shine in the book rather than going all-out throughout. As a result, some moments in his career get short shrift — for example, there’s little more than a transcript of the King of the Ring 96 promo. However, at other points Austin goes into great detail about his thinking and philosophy behind wrestling. Highlights include a 10-page final chapter about the need for spontaneity and believable characters, as well as a reprint of a memo Chris Adams gave him explaining how to structure a match. There’s also an excellent insight into his emotions and physical problems going into what turned out to be his final match. It’s certainly not a can’t miss read: the documentary on the DVD of the same name covers his career highlights, while Austin’s twice-weekly podcasts have plenty of philosophy for students of the game. However, it’s definitely worth the money…